Information and Communication Technology

Email


Visit the Email Upgrade section for information getting re-connected to the new Exchange 2010 email system.

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  • Setup
  • FAQs
  • Mail Quota
  • Archiving
  • Security

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Set up your email client to download your email, contacts and calendars to your computer.

Visit our Go Mobile section to find out how to download your email to your mobile phone or tablet.

FAQs

FAQs

Do you have a question about your email account? Read on.

  • How much space do I have to store my emails?
    Students are given 100MB of space in their university mailbox and staff are allocated 500MB.
    Your mailbox includes your inbox, deleted items, sent items, drafts, personal calendars, contacts and any other subfolders that you may have created.
  • What happens if I run out of space?
    When your mailbox reaches 90% a warning message is sent to you, at 100% you will be unable to send emails and at 120% you will not receive messages. Incoming email is queued for four days and these messages will be delivered when space is cleared.
  • How do I clear space in my mailbox and archive emails?
    Click the Quota tab to find out more.
  • My inbox is empty, so why is my mailbox full?
    There is more to your mailbox than just the inbox - sent items, drafts, deleted items and any subfolders that you have created also count towards your quota. Don't forget to empty your deleted items folder regularly too.
  • How do I automatically forward my email to another account?
    Login to Outlook Web App and click 'options' from the menu in the top right. Select 'create an inbox rule'. Press New. From the first dropdown, select '[apply to all messages]' and from the second, click 'redirect the message to'. Type your email address in the 'to' field and press OK.
    Enter a Rule Name.
    Tick the "Forward it to" option and enter the email address you want to forward the emails to.
    Tick/Untick the “Keep a copy….” option. Press Save.
    All emails sent to your account will now be forwarded to the address that you provided. Remember to occasionally log onto your university email and empty your deleted items folder or your mailbox will become full.
  • I have set up automatic forwarding, so why is my mailbox still full
    When emails are forwarded (even if you have selected not to retain a copy) the email is added to your deleted items folder so you will need to log onto your university email and empty the folder periodically.
  • How can I add an out of office message?
    Login to Outlook Web App and click 'options' from the menu in the top right. Select 'set automatic replies'. Click 'send automatic replies', type your message, change any options as you require and press save.

Email Quota

Managing your email quota

Outlook 2013

How much space do I have?

Students are given 100MB of space in their university mailbox and staff are allocated 500MB.
Your mailbox includes your inbox, deleted items, sent items, drafts, personal calendars, contacts and any other subfolders that you may have created.

What happens if I run out of space?

You will receive a warning when your mailbox reaches 90%. At 100% messages can’t be sent and at 120% messages can’t be sent or received. Incoming email is queued for four days and these messages will be delivered when space is cleared.

My inbox is empty, so why is my mailbox full?Empty Deleted Items

There is more to your mailbox than just the inbox; sent items, drafts, deleted items and any subfolders that you have created also count towards your quota.

Don't forget to empty your deleted items folder too:

1. Right click on the Deleted Items folder.
2. Select Empty Deleted Items.

How can I clear space in my mailbox?

Folder properties

You may be surprised by how many emails you are storing and how many old entries there are in your calendar. In Outlook, right click on a folder or your personal calendar and select Properties. Change "Show number of unread items" to "Show total number of items" and press Apply to find out. We'd strongly recommend that you store no more than 5,000 entries in a single folder or calendar.

Use the mailbox cleanup tool

Find out how much space each folder in your mailbox is using with the mailbox cleanup tool.

In Outlook 2010, click File and select Info, then mailbox cleanup. In Outlook 2013, click File and select 'cleanup tools' from the 'mailbox cleanup' section.

Press the 'view mailbox size' button to see a breakdown of how much quota each folder is using. (1 MB = 1024 KB)

You can also use the 'find' function to search for old or large emails.

Save large attachments

Any files attached to emails contribute towards your email quota usage. We often find that a small number of emails can take up a huge percentage of someone's mail quota. Where you can, try to save the attachment to your G:\ drive and delete the email. Alternatively, you could archive large emails to your PC - click the Archiving tab for instructions.

Sort by size

An easy way to find out which emails are using the most quota is to sort by size.

From across the top of your inbox, click 'by date' or 'arrange by date' and select 'size'. Your emails will sorted from largest to smallest. Locate and delete your largest messages.Sort by Size

When you have finished, click the 'size' option and select 'date' to sort your emails back into chronological order.

Use large mail searchLarge Mail

Outlook has a search specifically created to locate large mail items. In your folder list, look for “Large Mail” in the Search Folders section.

Archiving

Archiving emails

Free up space by archiving emails that you want to keep copies of, but don't need to keep in your main mailbox.

For emails that you can't delete but you don't need regular access to, you could archive them. They will still be accessible within Outlook but won't count towards your mail quota.
These emails are moved from the mail server to a location that you select, so won't be visible in Outlook Web App (OWA) unless you move them back into your main inbox.

Step One: Create an archive (PST) file

  1. Personal FoldersOpen Outlook 2010 or 2013 and click the Home tab.
  2. Select 'new items', then 'more items' and 'Outlook data file'.
  3. Select a location to save your archive file to.
    A secure network drive (such as the G or Z) are a good place as they are regularly backed up, so you won't lose your archived emails if your PC fails.
  4. Type a filename - this will be the name of the folder in Outlook.
  5. Make a note of the filename and location of the PST file - you will need this information to back up the file or if you move to a new PC and need to re-import your emails.
  6. Tick 'add optional password', if you wish. This means that the emails in the file will be inaccessible without typing the password. This can be anything you want, but make sure you remember the password – ICT will be unable to recover this for you.
  7. Click OK.

Step Two: Add emails to the archive folder

  1. Your archive folder will now appear in your folder list.
  2. Drag and drop any emails or folders that you would like to archive into this folder. The emails will be moved from the mail server, freeing up your quota.
  3. Treat this folder like any other in your mailbox. You can create subfolders and move emails in and out at any time.
  4. You could also use the mailbox cleanup to automatically move emails that are older than a specific date to your archive file.

Moving PCs or reimaging

If you choose to store your archive file on your C drive, you should take a copy of it before you move to a new PC or have your computer reimaged. Browse to the location that you selected in step one, part 3 and copy the PST file to a safe location like a network drive (G: or X:) or to a memory stick.
On your new PC, copy the PST file to the location where you would like it to be stored. Import your archive into Outlook by clicking File, Import and Export, Import from another program or file and selecting Personal Folder File.

Security

Unless you have stored your PST file in a secure location, such as a network drive (eg. the X or G drive),you must periodically back up your PST file to ensure that no data is lost should your PC fail.

Security

Email security

Protect your digital life

Email is part of our day to day lives, but unfortunately is also a target for many online nuisances and threats.

Between four and six million emails are sent to University email accounts each week. 1.2 million emails are sent from addresses external to the University, of which only 25% are actually legitimate emails and are allowed to enter the mail system.

ICTD has a range of services in place to prevent you from receiving unwanted or dangerous emails, whilst still ensuring that legitimate emails are delivered. The vast majority of spam emails are blocked, but unfortunately one or two may find their way into your mailbox. Our mail system constantly evolves, but as a result it may occasionally allow the delivery of new types of spam, until it becomes apparent that these messages should be blocked.

Sometimes perception of spam email varies from person to person. For some a daily email from a coupon site offers the chance to snap up a great deal, but for others these emails are a nuisance. In some cases the recipient may have actually opted in to receive them in the past but now consider the emails to be spam.

Viruses

Viruses can be spread through emails, either embedded within the message or as an attachment.

To prevent your computer from becoming infected, you should ensure that you have up to date antivirus software installed. Avoid reading emails from unknown senders and never open suspicious attachments, such as .zip and .exe files. If you’re still unsure, try saving the attachment and scanning it with antivirus software before opening.

Our Mirapoint mail servers block the vast majority of virus laden emails from entering the University network.

SpamSpam

Spam is unsolicited junk email, usually attempting to sell you a product or a service, or containing links to unscrupulous websites hosting viruses or scams. If you have an email address, the likelihood is that you have received a spam email – it is estimated that 78% of all email sent is spam.

Email addresses are collected from a variety of sources, usually automatically by a computer program, and then sold on to spam senders. Sources include websites, social media, email chains and the address books of accounts that have been accessed (compromised) by spammers through virus infections and phishing scams.

Try searching Google for your email address. If it’s on there, there’s a good chance that you’re already on a spammer’s database. If you need to publish your email try to do it in a way that couldn't be read by an automated program – replace the @ symbol with the word “at”, or post it as an image instead.

Phishing

Phishing emails are a form of spam email designed to deliberately trick you into providing personal information such as a password or bank details. Common examples include “over quota” warning messages and emails purporting to be from banks, tax authorities and popular websites such as Facebook, eBay and Paypal.

No legitimate organisation will ever request that you click a link or reply to an email in order to provide personal information.

Give away signs of a phishing email include:

  • Personal information - requesting that you click a link or reply to an email in order to login or provide personal information. Don’t ever click a link in an email unless you’re sure that it is from a legitimate source and even then, never click through to a login page.
  • The urgency of the language – encouraging you to take action immediately or face consequences. The more urgent the language, the more suspect the message.
  • The sender’s email address – often (but not always) the sender’s email address will be entirely different to the email address that you’d expect the company to use. If the email doesn't match - it's a dead cert that the email is a scam. However, there are ways to spoof the email address to give the impression that the email is sent from a legitimate source, so don't assume that if the email address looks correct, that the message is genuine.
  • Spelling and grammar – a large number of phishing emails tend to contain errors in the spelling, grammar and syntax, as well as unusual phrases.

If your University email account is accessed as a result of a phishing scam your account will be used to send spam email which could damage the reputation of the University and could potentially result in the Hull.ac.uk addresses being blacklisted by email providers - meaning that the entire University may be unable to send message to these email providers. ICTD will take action to prevent your account from being used to send spam as soon as we become aware that your account has been compromised. Your password will be changed and you may be locked out of your account. If this happens, should contact the Service Desk for assistance.

Phishing scams are a constant threat so you should always be vigilant. ICTD does not send a warning email each time a phishing email is received as this itself would be considered spam and dilute the impact of any emails that we do send on the subject.

Hoaxes and email forwards

Unlike most spam emails, you might find that you receive warning emails and other messages from people that you know which encourage you to forward the message on to everyone in your address book.

Examples include warnings of the “worst virus ever” or promises that a high profile organisation will donate money to charity each time the email is forwarded.

These emails are always hoaxes. Senders of spam emails use the long email chains to harvest email addresses to add to their spam databases.

You should delete these messages – never forward them on.

Visit hoax-slayer.com for a whole archive of examples of known hoaxes.

Tips to keep safe

  • If you receive a spam email, delete it. Never reply to the message as this will confirm to the sender that they have sent a message to a 'live' email account. Rather than being unsubscribed, you'll receive even more spam.
  • Don’t set up an out of office auto reply unless you absolutely need to. Out of office messages reply to all senders indiscriminately – both legitimate senders and spam emails. If you auto-reply to a spam email, you are confirming that your account is live.
  • Keep your email address private. Spam senders have programs that trawl the internet to collect email addresses for their database. Don’t publish yours online if you can avoid it. If you do need to post your address, try doing so in a way that wouldn’t look obvious to a computer program – replace the @ symbol with the word “at”, or post it as an image instead.
  • Avoid reading emails from unknown senders and never open suspicious attachments, such as .zip and .exe files.
  • If you find that you regularly receive spam emails that contain certain words or phrases that you wouldn’t expect to find in a legitimate email, you could set up a rule to automatically delete these emails.

Should I report spam?

Spam is a serious problem and ICTD are taking every measure available to reduce the number of unwanted emails that reach you. Our anti-spam systems are automated and continually evolving in order to identify and prevent the delivery of spam emails, so there is no need to forward spam to ICTD unless you have a specific query.

Spam emails are generally sent from compromised or disposable accounts, with the real sender masking their identity, so there is no way of tracing the individual.

It is not necessary to notify the Service Desk of such messages.

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