OpenCampus Lifelong Learning & Public Engagement

Culture Café Heritage and History Series

Autumn 2016

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Hull and East Riding Heritage and History Talks

We are thrilled to be able to celebrate the rich and varied heritage and history of Hull and East Yorkshire in this new series of talks.  Not just that, we are very proud to be able to share with you the knowledge and expertise of some of our most highly-regarded academic staff here at the University of Hull.

OpenCampus talks are always informal and friendly.  They are free to attend and are open to all.  You don’t have to have attended before and you don’t need any prior experience or knowledge.  We only ask that you book in advance and come prepared to be amazed!

What a great way to get you in the mood for the City of Culture year!   If you are lucky enough to be a City of Culture Volunteer, you are very welcome to attend these sessions to help you in your role. 

Please note there will be a 15 minute comfort break at a natural break midway in the talk.  There will also be time for questions at the end of the talk.

Talk Date Time Speaker Venue Book a Place
A short history of Hull and the sea

01 October

(Saturday)

11am - 1pm Dr Robb Robinson Lecture Theatre 2, First Floor, Wilberforce Building Book online now - 01/10
An introduction to and tour of the University of Hull Art Collection (Ref: Tour2) *NOW FULL*

11 October

(Tuesday)

6.30pm - 7.30 pm  John Bernasconi University Art Gallery, Brynmor Jones Library Book online now - 11/10
Trauma and utopianism in Second World War Hull

15 October

(Saturday)

11am - 1pm

Professor David  Atkinson

Lecture Theatre 2, First Floor, Wilberforce Building Book online now - 15/10
An introduction to and tour of the University of Hull Art Collection (Ref: Tour3)  *Places still available

25 October

(Tuesday)

 

6.30pm - 7.30pm  John Bernasconi University Art Gallery, Brynmor Jones Library Book online now - 25/10
Celebrating Hull's rich literary heritage

29 October

(Saturday)

 

11am - 1pm Dr Stewart Mottram & Dr Jane Thomas Lecture Theatre 2, First Floor, Wilberforce Building Book online now - 29/10 
An introduction to and tour of the University of Hull Art Collection (Ref: Tour1)  *NOW FULL*

05 November

(Saturday)

11am - 12pm John Bernasconi University Art Gallery, Brynmor Jones Library Book online now - 05/11
Come forward and help us in this emergency: the response of the British Red Cross to conscription and the Battle of the Somme

12 November

(Saturday)

11am - 1pm

Dr Rosemary Wall

Lecture Theatre 2, First Floor, Wilberforce Building Book online now - 12/11 

Hull's contribution to emancipation and the abolition of slavery and the Slave Trade

26 November

(Saturday)

11am - 1pm Prof John Oldfield Lecture Theatre 2, First Floor, Wilberforce Building Book online now - 26/11

Hull's political heritage: the fight for parliamentary representation from 1906 to 2016

10 December

(Saturday)

11am - 1pm Prof Philip Norton the Lord Norton of Louth Lecture Theatre 2, First Floor, Wilberforce Building Book online now - 10/12

 

1. A short history of Hull and the sea

Dr Robb Robinson

01 October 2016  - 11am - 1pm                                       

LT2 Wilberforce Building, University of Hull, Cottingham Road, Hull. HU6 7RX

This talk will look at Hull's enduring relationship with all things maritime and some of the key events that have shaped our city over the centuries.  It will consider some of the remarkable characters that have played their part in Hull’s rich history, and who by turn have contributed to Hull’s enduring influence across the world. 

Book online now

 

2. Trauma and utopianism in Second World War Hull 

Professor David Atkinson

15 October  2016   - 11am - 1pm                                     

LT2 Wilberforce Building, University of Hull, Cottingham Road, Hull. HU6 7RX

By most estimates, Hull was the second most blitzed British city of the war, with around 1200 people killed and many more left homeless. This devastation led the British Government to fear that Hull was approaching ‘civilian collapse’, and a scientific survey was launched to identify the point at which civilian morale would break.  Clear evidence of trauma was found, but civilian collapse was discounted and the city was left to carry on beneath the bombs. Yet the findings of the Hull survey had significant repercussions. The Hull data informed subsequent British bombing strategy in Germany, and, closer to home, the city council commissioned the ‘Abercrombie plan’ to re-build the city using modern, rational, utopian planning to restore the city’s pride, rebuild its communities, and help to generate better lives for post-war generations. 

This presentation will connect these events and embed Hull’s wartime experience, and various responses, within these broader historical and geographical frames.  

Book online now

 

3. Celebrating Hull's rich literary heritage 

Dr Stewart Mottram & Dr Jane Thomas

29 October 2016   -   11am - 1pm       

LT2 Wilberforce Building, University of Hull, Cottingham Road, Hull. HU6 7RX

This talk will explore the formative influence of Hull on three local writers who portrayed the city in their work. The Hull poet and MP Andrew Marvell is today recognized as one of the most important poets of the seventeenth century, but Marvell’s poetry is also important for what it can tell us about the town Marvell grew up in and later represented in parliament. Marvell’s poetry registers the major role that his boyhood home, the Hull Charterhouse, played in the First English Civil War, while other Hull landmarks – the Old Grammar School and Holy Trinity Church – influenced the poet’s later writing on religious freedom. The death of his father by drowning in the River Humber adds another personal dimension to one of Marvell’s best-know poems, ‘To His Coy Mistress’.

Deeply affected by the depression years, Winifred Holtby’s Hull (Kingsport) is a place where the precariousness and hardship of life is balanced by its fleeting and necessary pleasures. The city’s distinguished theatres, glamorous cinemas and magical street names stand in stark contrast to its slums; providing leisure and escape for its ‘characterful’ inhabitants and combining with its railway and eastward facing river to open up a landlocked city to influences from London, Europe and beyond.

Stevie Smith who left the city at the age of three recalls, nevertheless, ‘the smell of the lovely Humber mud in my nose’ and ‘the water moving with dignity’.

‘Hull has a character and you will find it’ wrote Winifred Holtby to her friend Phyllis Bentley, who was preparing to lecture there in 1930. We will try and reveal the character of the city as it shaped itself to three of its most distinctive writers.

Book online now 

 

 

4. An introduction to and tour of the University of Hull Art Collection 

Mr John Bernasconi (Director of Fine Art, University of Hull)

     
Tuesday 11 October 2016   6.30pm - 7.30 pm       *Now full*      
Tuesday 25 October 2016 6.30pm - 7.30 pm    New date added - places available
Saturday 05 November 2016  11am - 1pm    *Now full* 
                              

University Art Gallery, Brynmor Jones Library, University of Hull, Cottingham Road, Hull. HU6 7RX

Join a special guided tour of the University of Hull Art Collection in its stunning new gallery and be shown round by the Director, John Bernasconi. The new gallery is on the ground floor of the University’s Brynmor Jones Library on the Cottingham Road campus.  It was the final stage of a multi-million pound transformation of the Library and opened in 2015.  The gallery is much more spacious than the previous one in the basement of the Middleton Hall and allows much more of the Collection to be shown in much better viewing conditions.

The University Art Collection has been described by Fred Hohler (Chairman, Public Catalogue Foundation) as ‘a collection of breath-taking quality’. It specialises in art in Britain 1890-1940 and features paintings, sculpture, drawings and prints. It includes works by Beardsley, Vanessa Bell, Duncan Grant, Sickert, Steer, Lucien Pissarro,  Augustus John,  Stanley Spencer,  Wyndham Lewis and Ben Nicholson as well as sculpture by Epstein,  Gill,  Gaudier-Brzeska and Henry Moore. Camden Town Group and Bloomsbury Group artists are particularly well represented.

John Bernasconi will describe the remarkable origins of the Collection and discuss its most important works and recent acquisitions, as well as answering any questions on the Collection or plans for 2017.

Book online now 

 

5. Come forward and help us in this emergency: the response of the British Red Cross to conscription and the Battle of the Somme 

Dr Rosemary Wall, Senior Lecturer in Global History

12 November 2016     -   11am - 1pm                                   

LT2 Wilberforce Building, University of Hull, Cottingham Road, Hull. HU6 7RX

In 1916, the British Red Cross (BRC) faced several crises. A third of Voluntary Aid Detachment members were male and the Military Service Acts meant that many of these men were conscripted, leading to a recruitment drive for more female members. Yet other organisations were also competing for female volunteers. Within months of these Acts, the first day of the Battle of the Somme on 1 July 1916 led to nearly 20,000 deaths amongst British soldiers, and a further 40,000 wounded. The offensive continued until November, resulting in 420,000 Commonwealth casualties.

One of the casualties from the Somme was J.R.R. Tolkien who suffered from trench fever from autumn 1916, a relapsing disease which led to him being admitted to the Red Cross’ Brooklands Officers Hospital in 1917, in the building which is now the Dennison Centre at the University of Hull. In addition to transporting and caring for those who survived the battle, BRC members had the responsibility of searching for the many missing and wounded in hospitals at home and abroad.

This talk examines how the BRC coped with the events of 1916.

Book online now 

 

 

6. Hull's contribution to emancipation and the abolition of slavery and the Slave Trade 

Prof John Oldfield

26 November 2016   -   11am - 1pm                                

LT2 Wilberforce Building, University of Hull, Cottingham Road, Hull. HU6 7RX

This talk will look at Hull’s contribution to the campaigns against slavery and the slave trade (1787-1833), focussing on both individual and collective efforts to bring slavery to an end. A key figure here was William Wilberforce, who as MP for Hull and later Yorkshire was the chief parliamentary spokesman for ‘abolition’. Wilberforce was a truly global figure, and a key part of this talk will discuss his reception overseas, particularly in the United States, where he was highly regarded by both black and white abolitionists.

Wilberforce also played a part in the creation of Sierra Leone, which was intended to provide an alternative to the slave trade in the shape of legitimate commerce with Africa. Wilberforce was a towering figure but this talk will also pay attention to those local individuals and societies that lent him and the national anti-slavery movement such vital support.

Book online now

 

 

7. Hull's political heritage: the fight for parliamentary representation from 1906 to 2016

Prof Philip Norton, Lord Norton of Louth (Professor of Government and Director of the Centre for Legislative Studies, University of Hull)

10 December 2016    -  11am - 1pm                                  

LT2 Wilberforce Building, University of Hull, Cottingham Road, Hull. HU6 7RX

This talk examines changes in the parliamentary landscape of Hull since the early 20th Century, identifying the extent to which the outcome of elections in Hull have reflected shifts in British politics.   Hull was characterised in the early 20th Century by the clash between Conservatives and Liberals, shaped in no small part by religion, and then by the greater influence of economics and the displacement of the Liberal Party by the Labour Party as the principal opposition party. 

Hull was a battleground between the Liberals and the Conservatives until the 1920s, when the conflict became one between Labour and the Conservatives.  Liberal MP for Hull Central, J. M. Kenworthy, switched from the Liberals to Labour in 1926 and Labour took three of the four Hull seats in 1929, only for the Conservatives to achieve a clean sweep in 1931.  Labour re-took two seats in 1935, but the Conservatives held one or more seats until another Labour clean sweep in the 1945 general election.  The Conservatives held Hull North from 1951 to 1964, but thereafter the outcome of elections has reinforced the growing urban-rural divide, urban areas becoming more Labour and rural areas more Conservative. 

The talk also examines those who have represented Hull in Parliament, ranging from Conservative Sir Mark Sykes (of the Sykes-Picot line) to Liberal Thomas Ferens (founder of Hull University and Ferens Art Gallery) and Labour Cabinet ministers John Prescott and Alan Johnson.

Book online now

 

For further details please contact:  Jackie McAndrew on 01482 466585 or Ian Calvert on 01482 462192.

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