OpenCampus Lifelong Learning & Public Engagement

Spies, Trolls, Drones and Polls: Being(s) in Cyberspace

OpenCampus Tea-Time Talks Series

March 2017

test

You are warmly invited to join us for a new series of weekly talks taking place in March 2017.  These talks are dedicated to a topic that affects each one of us in some way or another - the question of Ethics and Rights in Cyberspace.  

Funded by the Economic and Social Research Council, "The Common Good: Ethics and Rights in Cyber Security" project seeks to understand where the balance lies between security and ethics in digital governance.  If the recent controversies surrounding U.S. governmental surveillance and implicated technology companies demonstrated anything, it is the need for proportionate, just and effective cyber security in digital governance that is committed to the common good.

The research project takes a multidisciplinary approach, bringing together experts in the fields of social science, security studies, intelligence studies, cultural studies, political philosophy, and public policy and institutional ethics. With such a range of disciplines represented, the project is ideally placed to provide a balanced analysis of the subject, ensuring governance, security, rights and ethics are all taken account of.

The ‘Spies, Trolls, Drones and Polls: Being(s) in Cyberspace’ Tea-Time Talks series will outline the work that the investigators have undertaken on the project to date.

OpenCampus talks are free, accessible, friendly and informal and there will be opportunities to ask questions for those of you who want to. Whether you are a member of the public, a student, a patient or carer, a practitioner, an alumni or one of our lifelong learning students – you are all very welcome indeed!

Come along and learn something new! 

Details and online booking can be found below.

Project website - For more information on the project you can also visit the website at http://cgercs.wixsite.com/ercs

Date Time Title  Speaker Venue Book Here

Tuesday

7 March

6.30pm - 8.30pm 'Saying it as it is': Speech acts, context and tempered agency in a digital world. Professor James Connelly   Lecture Theatre 2, First Floor, Wilberforce Building Book onto Talk 1

Tuesday 14 March

6.30pm - 8.30pm The Strategic and Moral Implications of Cyber Attack Dr David Lonsdale Lecture Theatre 2, First Floor, Wilberforce Building Book onto Talk 2 

Tuesday 21 March

6.30pm - 8.30pm Perceptions of Privacy, Surveillance, Trust, and Security in On line Life Dr Mike Brayshaw Lecture Theatre 2, First Floor, Wilberforce Building Book onto Talk 3

Tuesday 28 March

6.30pm - 8.30pm Digital Dystopias: Imagining Our Virtual Futures in a Post -Orwellian World Dr Simon Willmetts Lecture Theatre 2, First Floor, Wilberforce Building Book onto Talk 4

NB:

1. We reserve the right to amend the programme and content of talks a necessary.

2. Please note all talks will take place in Lecture Theatre 2 in the Wilberforce Building. We may move the talk to a bigger location if we have more than 200 people booked on the talk. If you have booked on to the talk you will be notified of any changes.  This page will be updated with any change in venue.

3. We may add talks to the above list.  Check the website regularly.  If you are on the OpenCampus mailing list we will keep you posted.  If you would like to join please us know at opencampus@hull.ac.uk

 

1. 'Saying it as it is': Speech acts, context and tempered agency in a digital world

Tuesday 7 March - 6.30pm - 8.30pm

Professor James Connelly - Professor of Political Theory, Director of the Institute of Applied Ethics,  Director of the Centre for Idealism and New Liberalism, Principal Investigator, The Common Good: Ethics & Rights in Cybersecurity, University of Hull.

Lecture Theatre 2, First Floor, Wilberforce Building,  Cottingham Road, Hull. HU6 7RX.

Abstract

When is a tweet a tweet, when is it commentary, and when is it a political intervention? This was generally a rhetorical question until a year or so ago. Now it is not. What is the performative nature of digital acts in a digital world? How new is this? Have the distinctions between public and private been irrevocably shattered in the digital world we now share, whether wittingly or unwittingly? Speech is action: in certain contexts it always was, but we are currently catching up with what this means in a digital context. The nature and meaning of an action is sensitive to, and in part defined by, its context. In the past we were more certain than we can ever be in the present that there were clearly demarcated contexts, among them the public and the private, and we judged actions and utterances partly in accordance to their context because their context in turn tended to define their reach in the world. We no longer – or should not longer – think this. There are (and always were) many, various, fluid and overlapping distinctions between the public and the private; with the rise of digital technology there is an urgent need to extend our understanding of the complex nature of the relationship between the public and the private. From a discussion of the contested nature of the public and private, I argue that no hard and fast distinction between public and private is possible. I address individual responsibility and the nature of the speech act, in particular, its changing nature in cyber contexts and the many different layered and overlapping contexts of utterance and action.

 

2. The Strategic and Moral Implications of Cyber Attack

Tuesday 14 March - 6.30pm - 8.30pm

Dr David Lonsdale - Director of the Centre for Security Studies, University of Hull.

Lecture Theatre 2, First Floor, Wilberforce Building,  Cottingham Road, Hull. HU6 7RX

Abstract to Follow

 

3. Perceptions of Privacy, Surveillance, Trust, and Security in On line Life

Tuesday 21 March - 6.30pm - 8.30pm

Dr Mike Brayshaw - Lecturer in the School of Engineering and Computer Science, University of Hull.

Lecture Theatre 2, First Floor, Wilberforce Building,  Cottingham Road, Hull. HU6 7RX

Abstract to Follow

 

4. Digital Dystopias: Imagining Our Virtual Futures in a Post -Orwellian World

Tuesday 28 March - 6.30pm - 8.30pm

Dr Simon Willmetts - Lecturer in American Studies, University of Hull.

Lecture Theatre 2, First Floor, Wilberforce Building,  Cottingham Road, Hull. HU6 7RX

Abstract to Follow

 

For further details please contact:  Ian Calvert at i.calvert@hull.ac.uk or Jackie.mcandrew@hull.ac.uk 

Back to top