Hull University Business School

Professor Stephen Dobson

Professor Steve Dobson

Head of Subject/Research Director

Economics

  • Biography
  • Qualifications
  • Teaching
  • Research
  • Key Publications

Biography

Stephen Dobson joined Hull University Business School as Director of Research in January 2011, having previously spent three years at Nottingham Trent University as Professor of Economics. Before joining Nottingham Trent he was Professor of Economics at Otago University in New Zealand where he served three years as Head of the Department of Economics. Stephen has also worked at Queen’s University Belfast, Hull University, University of Central Lancashire, Leeds University, Reading University and the University of the West Indies in Trinidad. Stephen is passionate about sport and has spent most of his life supporting Leicester City FC.  

Qualifications

BSc(Econ) (Hull), MA (CNAA), PhD (CNAA)  

Teaching

Stephen has extensive teaching experience in universities in the UK and overseas. He has teaching interests in microeconomics, applied economics, and the economics of sport. 

Research

Stephen’s main research interest is the economics of professional team sport. He is co-author with John Goddard of the research monograph The Economics of Football, published by Cambridge University Press (1st edition 2001, 2nd edition 2011). Stephen has published extensively on various aspects of the economics of football, including bias and inconsistency in football refereeing, the demand for football, the impact of managerial change on team performance, the performance of football managers, and strategic behaviour by football teams during matches. He is a member of the editorial boards of the Journal of Sports Economics, International Journal of Sports Finance, and International Journal of Sports Science and Engineering. Stephen is a Research Fellow at the National Centre for Econometric Research in Australia. He is also interested in the economics of developing countries and has published papers on this topic, especially with regard to Latin America.

Publications

Selected Publications

Convergence of divergence in cross-country growth, International Review of Applied Economics, Vol 25, (2011), ISSN 0269-2171 (print), 1465-3486 (online) (with E Strobl & C Ramlogan)

The Economics of Football (2nd edition), Cambridge University Press (2011) (with JA Goddard).

Is there a trade-off between corruption and inequality? Evidence from Latin America, Economics Letters (2010) Vol. 107 No.2 pp 102-104 (with C Dobson). 

Optimizing strategic behaviour in a dynamic setting in professional team sports, European Journal of Operational Research (2010) Vol. 205 No.3 pp 661-669 (with JA Goddard).

The influence of social pressure and nationality on individual decisions: evidence from the behaviour of referees, Journal of Economic Psychology (2010) Vol. 31 No.2 pp 181–191 (with P Dawson).

Is there an openness Kuznets curve?, Kyklos (2009) Vol. 62 No.2 pp 226-238 (with C Dobson).

Are football referees really biased and inconsistent? Evidence from the English Premier League, Journal of the Royal Statistical Society, Series A (2007) Vol. 170 No.1 pp 231-250 (with JA Goddard, J Wilson and P Dawson). 

Persistence in sequences of football match results: a Monte Carlo analysis, European Journal of Operational Research (2003) Vol. 148 No.2 pp 247-256 (with JA Goddard).

Economic growth and convergence in Latin America, Journal of Development Studies (2002) Vol. 38 No.6 pp 83-104 (with C Ramlogan). 

Introduction to Economics, Oxford University Press (1999) (with S Palfreman).

Performance, revenue and cross-subsidisation in the Football League, 1927-94, Economic History Review(1998) Vol. 51 No.4 pp 763-785 (with JA Goddard).

The demand for professional league football in England and Wales, 1925-92, Journal of the Royal Statistical Society, Series D (1995) Vol. 44 No.2 pp 259-277 (with JA Goddard).

The property market and industrial location, Scottish Journal of Political Economy (1989) Vol. 36 No.1 pp 1-18 (with JK Bowers and JA Goddard).

Further

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